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20130801
20130831
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CSPAN2 75
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 1:00pm EDT
george bush. >> guest: they were excited to get rid of 12 years of reagan-bush. you have to realize in 1992, it was economically pretty depressed. people as much as they did in 2001 at op to miss him. they wanted to turn the page. they want to see the country in a different direction. there was someone who presented the ideology is baby boomers. it seemed very natural that they would get us excited and caught up in that. >> host: in train to come read the entire time and mtv as alcohol and smoke for a committed vegetarian and a virgin. was that rare? >> guest: to have all of those things in the same person, yeah, that was pretty rare. some punk rockers would call that straight edge. there are an entire stream within the punk rock community that feel like they need control of your body is the wisest thing you can do. i did not have that sort of intention are philosophy or foresight. it just so happened i had been sober. i didn't find drugs and alcohol did anything for me. i was worried i would be something impulsive and if i were under the influence. i honestly didn't need them. it w
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 7:00am EDT
. it was humiliating then, it is humiliating now, but it makes money. >> host: laura tweets in george bush started the aids program in africa, the one good thing he did foreign policywise. >> guest: i suppose i would concede that. i don't know what else to say about president bush. , i don't think he was concerned substantively about a great deal of things, certainly not about black issues, and so i am at a loss for words to comment beyond about george bush. >> host: rodney in baltimore, go ahead with your question or comment for randall robinson. >> caller: hal r. you? a pleasure and honor to speak with you. meanwhile calling about blackwell's disparities, the american banking system where we got most of our wealth in the housing sector and lower wages in employment. under the obama administration, if african-americans are doing worse under his administration more than the previous four administrations? >> guest: unemployment among blacks is 16%. whites are doing marginally better, blacks are doing significantly worse. the question is how much of that do we ascribe to the president? of course the
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 5:00pm EDT
the presidency, said, and the house and did not like george bush very much. sure hated losing to them in 2004. they did not quit. they kept working. they took the house and the senate and the white house. it played by the rules. we took them back in 2010. never try to impeach george bush. think long and hard. these things are difficult because it is always easy to say try it. we are doing is now working. usually what that means is we need to work harder for we doing . i am old enough to watch barry goldwater go down in flames. i hated it. it took 16 years to get ronald reagan. but when we got ronald reagan it changed america and the world and ended the old soviet system. so democracy is hard work, stuff like this, people going in knocking on doors, people, you know, going out and voting. we do it. our system works. it's hard to work, and it's hard to work in part because that is what the founders wanted to be. very afraid of centralized powerful government. it will make this difficult to do. but power announcer representatives with the people, the states every year, president that for four ye
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 7:30pm EDT
who is going to get the middle-class boat which continues up to this day. george bush won decides to look more middle-class by having a pizza with factory workers. he buys socks at jcpenney as well. bill clinton just has a better story. he promises to rebuild the prosperity of ordinary americans. and it doesn't hurt that he's from hope arkansas so of course he wins. things are rough going in the early 90s but things pick up in the mid-90s when the economy starts turning around. the beneficiary of a good economy in the second term and the rising stock market. i'm sorry? the resurgence? the recession ended and then we have the technology boom. you have the internet coming along in 1995 just around his second term and the stock market goes crazy with the bubble so it's inflated in the bubble is not real but if you had money in the stock market you do very well in the late 90s. so the upper middle class who does have money in the stock market pulse further away from the lower middle class who doesn't have a lot of money in the stock market. the stock market is benefiting from this tec
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 8:00pm EDT
a call from george w. bush and the former president said to mitt romney don't worry about the debate. you are going to do fine. i know from my own experience the president is not going to be fully prepared. this is in fact a truism. and, in president to run for re-election often you lose the first debate that they have. there are a lot of reasons. one is they haven't been spoken to for four years in the way they are about to be spoken to by their opponent traded their aides are somewhat more respectful than their opponents on the debate stage. second, they think they're prepared because they have dealing with these issues and they don't feel like they need to freshen up three of he didn't have a good mock debate in his mock debates were from mediocre to really bad. the day of the debate i ran into one of his people in the morning in denver who said what do you think? this person said i'm really worried trade i don't think he's ready for tonight and i'm worried about what is going to happen. as a result of that the stakes were a lot higher in later debates and there was a great moment when
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 2:45pm EDT
of freedom in 2006 from president george w. bush. have you been knighted here in the u.k.? >> guest: oh, no. no. because i don't like the honor system in this country, so i don't have anything to do with it. >> host: why don't you like it? >> guest: well, i think it's corrupt. i mean, that some at a higher level. so whereas in america it isn't, so that's okay. >> host: your book, "modern times," which is about the history of the world, you write the first line from that book is: the modern world began on 29, may, 1919. what happened on 29, may, 1919? >> guest: that was when we first became aware of the nature and the consequences of einstein's general theory of relativity. this he had worked on and written about two or three years before during the war, but during the war we hadn't been able to verify it. it was then verified after the, when the peace came and proved shown to be pretty accurate. and then it was announced at the royal society this london on the date you have just mentioned. so that's when, at any rate, among the cognizant, among the intellectuals and the scientific community
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 4:15pm EDT
of photographs taken over four weekends in 1989 when george bush's father was president. 1989. long island. two of the people photographed. the red and mohammad. you remember them a minute. they are photographed over four weekends. they followed them. okay. of the men photographed, there. okay. trained by ali. the guy i told you. the spy. you see the surveillance picture. three of them were convicted eventually in the world trade center. two were convicted in the plot to blow up the bridges and tonal manhattan. one killed the rabbi who was this famous rabbi murdered in midtown marriott hotel in 1990, november, who was the first blood spilled by al qaeda on american soil. and all of them who were trained by ali in a cell funded directly by bin laden. i put it in my first book "thousand years for revenge." it was dominate bid the fly and shake. who was the prince of jihad. when i finish this today. he's going to be -- he's as hot as he's been ever. he's the guy behind -- he inspired the benghazi attack. the hostage incident in algeria in jan. the guy that got morsi elected in egypt of the muslim
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 10:00pm EDT
friends with franklin, and that is what i used to like say is they were friends with, i don't know, george bush. [laughter] the example has got, a little dated. dickinson, i wrote a book about dickinson her relationship to a man. which was face mate -- fascinating to me. it was a strange historical moment you have the reclusive poet who never crosses her father's house of grounds for anybody or anything. enter to a 24-25 year friendship with a man lost to what is -- but known in his own time. famous as a fervent abolitionist. so fervent was he that he was the leader of the first federally authorized group of black troops during the civil war. long before the massachusetts 54th and which which was stationed in all places south carolina. in that particular point i was intrigued by the period. wanted to know more about it. wanted to do it justice in that was one of my first questions to myself how can i be responsible to the complication, the pain, the sorrow, the death of the death toll the great sense of liberation, the -- how can i be responsible to all of those historical events in many o
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 8:30pm EDT
-span: do you think people would be surprised you voted for george bush in 1980? >> guest: i suppose so because i think the most surprised person would probably be president bush. write to what what you think you'd be surprised? >> guest: well i think most presidents get sensitive about the post and "newsweek" as well and he had his issues with us but i think any president does. but i suspect he would not think i voted for him. c-span: give us a thumbnail sketch of the post today. how many newspapers and television stations? how big is said and what is the revenue on a yearly basis? >> guest: we are about ad 1.6 million in annual revenues and the company holds mainly "the washington post" and we have a small newspaper the herald and half of the international "herald tribune" and may have "newsweek" and six television stations and 1.5 million cable connections, and we also have -- which is our medium of "the washington post" web site. c-span: are you still chairman of the executive committee? -- committee. >> guest: i am. c-span: how long were you chairman of "the washington post"? >> gu
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 7:00am EDT
believe the economy was so messed up by george bush that obama struggled mightily to overcome this horrible situation he inherited. the second reason is most americans believe republicans only care about rich people. and those are branding problems that the republican party has to to overcome. and it's hard to overcome it because you've got three obstacles; academia, hollywood and our major media, all of which are overwhelmingly liberal. when you say something, it's got to be interpreted through the filter of those three entities, and often it's been distorted. >> host: larry elder is our guest, this is booktv on c-span2 live from the los angeles times festival of books, campus of usc. mike's in fort worth, texas. hi, mike. >> caller: how's it going, larry? my -- pretty good. i'm a african-american democrat, but i agree with you one of the big problems in the african-american community is lack of fathers in the house. but i think, larry, when you say that, you kind of come off kind of harsh on black people. now, what's the reason behind the lack of a lot of fathers being in th
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 7:00pm EDT
. george w. bush unsigned a treaty. the nuclear treaty. the united states believes it's exceptional, meaning everybody except us. meaning that if other nations can be bound by treaties that's great. it restricts what they can do. since the united states considers itself to be the gawrn or -- gawrnter of freedom, security, et. cetera, they want to be believe they need to be able to do anything they want in order to, you know, keep us all the safe. >> host: what are the numbers now about land mines and since you have been involved how many have gone away. how much money is spent? who is selling them around the world? >> guest: goodness. i should looked it up. i haven't worked on the campaign on the daily basis since early 2000. i can tell you there are 161 nations that are part of the treaty. all of the western hemisphere, except the united states and cuba. all of nato, except the united states. which is totally mind boggling. especially when the u.s. said it needs land mines to protect the allies. there have been no no recorded fail of land mines. even country like china and russia w
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 6:00pm EDT
be surprised to find out you voted for george bush in 1988? >> guest: i suppose so, because i think the most surprised person would probably be president bush. c-span: why do you think he'd be surprised? >> guest: well, i think that most presidents get sensitive about the post and newsweek as well. and they--he had his issues with us, but i think any president does. but i th--i--i suspect he would not think i'd voted for him. c-span: give us a--just a thumbnail sketch of the post company today. how many newspapers, television stations, how big is it, what's the gross revenues on a year's basis? >> guest: we're at about $1.6 billion in annual revenues, and the company holds mainly the washington post, and we have a small newspaper, the everel--everett herald and half of the international herald tribune. and then we have newsweek and we have six television stations and a million and a half cable connections. and we also have digital ink, which is our electronic media and a washington post web site. c-span: are you still chairman of the executive committee? >> guest: no--oh, yes, i am chairman
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 4:00pm EDT
before him, george bush, done marijuana, widely suspected of doing cocaine. the guy before him, bill clinton did marijuana. >> he didn't inhale. >> no, no, no, he said he didn't inhale. [laughter] he said he didn't inhale. but the point is that those guys are more typical of drug users than what you have been told and what you think. and that's not to say that people don't have problems, because there are people who have problems, and that's a small percentage. and we know how to deal with those problems. and the way we deal with the problem is not our current drug policy, because our current drug policy ends up with too many of our folks in jail. >> i'm going to pick up on that again, but i wanted to stay with trayvon for a minute because we know that even outside here on these streets today there are all kinds of protests all over the country reacting to the verdict of acquittal in the george zimmerman case a week ago. thousands of people are apparently protesting, and on the eve of that protest yesterday gave an emotional speech where he said he could have been trayvon. and he tal
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 12:00pm EDT
with, i don't know, george bush. [laughter] the example's gotten a little dated. dickenson, i wrote a book about dickenson's relationship to a man named thomas wentworth higginson because it was this idea of this strange historical moment when you have the reclusive poet par chance who never crosses her father's house or grounds for anybody or anything enter into a 25, 24, 25-year friendship with a pan named thomas higginson, lost to us now except, of course, from me. but lost to us now but famous in his own time as a fervent abolitionist. and so fervent was he that he was the leader of the first federally-authorized group of black troops during the civil war, long before the massachusetts 54th which was stationed in, of all places, south carolina. so in that particular sense, i was very intrigued by the particular period, wanted to know much more about it, wanted to do it justice, and that was my first or one of my first questions to myself is how can i be responsible to the complications, the pain, the sorrow, the death, the death tolls of the great sense of liberation, the great
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 4:45pm EDT
into the tony blare's comments with george bush on the microphone? oh, assad is like honey? what were they talking about? they seemed to like him. >> i don't recall that one. i recall the explaytive. referring to the g8 meeting in 2006 when -- during the israel hezbollah war, and bush leaned over to blare and whatever he called him, he said, you know, if we request get syria to stop this, put a four letter explaytive there, that will calm the situation, and what was interesting about, you know, that comment, and bush did not like that after 2003, 2004 particularly, and i asked bashar about that comment, and i said, what do you think of that comment by bush caught on tape? again, half expecting him to say, oh, you know, typical this, typical all that sort of stuff, he said, i love it. i love it because that means they are thinking about me. they are worried about me. that is part of syria foreign policy is having some sort of leverage. it's a weak country military militarily. the leverage is through the support of hezbollah, iran, support of hamas and palestinian territories. that's th
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 10:30am EDT
on to lose and then ronald reagan who went on to win two terms. now, george w. bush while i have a lot of criticisms of him in my book, was definitely somebody who was somewhat influenced by the conservative movement and had some movement conservatives in his administration as his father did. but he was not really himself a philosophically small government kind of guy. and i agree that a big problem in terms of actual conservatives winning the republican nomination is the fact that a lot of the conservatives who would be qualified or who are seen as qualified to be president come from, you know, rural districts, or they come from southern states, and there becomes more of a regional and cultural battle in the minds of a lot of people. and i think the other problem is that frequently what ends up happening is that the conservative candidate who appeals most to grassroots conservatives in the republican primaries -- and here i'm just talking about presidential primaries -- tends to be the candidate, the conservative who doesn't have the organization or the money to really go the distance
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 6:00am EDT
to win public opinion over. he understood. george bush unfortunately never did. and so what happened was when israel attacked gaza come when israel attacked lebanon, when the u.s. committed is outrageous and iraq we lost heir of public opinion and we had this little guy in tehran becoming the new hero of the arab masses, saying to them come your governments are doing nothing. i'm the one standing up against the west. in 2006, his numbers were way it. iran's numbers rose as arab alienation and frustration with the west group and as the ability or the willingness of their own leaders to challenge the west became obvious, they went down and aquatint shot went up. they became the resistance that was fighting for air of honor and everyone arab honor was viewed after abu ghraib, you know, it's tough. we don't want remember on the great. we forget it. arabs don't. we don't want to think about what the iraq war meant all those years, or what the continued situation of palestinians, or of lebanon beleaguered after all these years and continually under threat were occupied for 20 years. we don
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 11:00pm EDT
calculation and work to win public opinion over. baker understood it. george bush unfortunately never did. what happened was when israel attacked gaza when israel attacked lebanon and the u.s. committed outrages in iran we lost public opinion and we have this guy in tehran becoming the new hero of the arab masses saying to them your governments are doing nothing. i am the one standing up against the west on 2006 the numbers were way up. iran's numbers rose as arab alienation and frustration with the west grew. as the ability or the willingness of their own leaders to challenge the west became obvious they went down and ahmadinejad went up and to chart all assad window. it became the resistance that was fighting for arab honor and a period one one air of honor was viewed after abu ghraib. it's tough. we don't want to remember abu ghraib. the arabs don't. we don't want to think about what the iraq war meant all those years or the continued situation of palestinians over lebanon's beleaguered after all these years and continually under threat. it was occupied for 20 years. we don't want to t
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 11:00pm EDT
everything we could to overthrow the democratically-elected government of president aristide. george bush blocked loans from the interamerican development foundation of $146 million loans for education, water and things like that. the international republican institute arranged and organized the opposition to it and then we as a country trained rebel soldiers in the dominican republic, trained and armed them to come to haiti to overthrow the government and then the last analysis, those were a pulse didn't figure into it. bush carried out the coup himself on american soldiers who arrived at the home of the president and took him off at 3:00 in the morning to the central african republic. we have to had to go there. maxine waters, a jamaican parliamentarian and sharon webster and the president's lawyer flew off to rescue him to bring him back to jamaica and then condoleezza rice threatened to make the jamaican government -- threatened to make it very difficult for them if jamaica accepted aristide even for a matter of days before he went to south africa. all because he said the minimum inco
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 2:00pm EDT
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 10:00am EDT
on their taxes. >> up next, george w. bush institute resale the series of discussions looking at immigrants contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we w
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 10:15am EDT
, and this was the restriction of george bush and obama couldn't put up with but i agree with everything bob said, this isn't my primary interest but if i ever going to play the legal game, in terms of privacy as some kind of thing the we have. the fourth amendment like most of the bill of rights is a prohibition on government conduct. it doesn't matter what you do or how open you are but there are things both states doesn't have the authority to do because it wasn't given that authority. second of all in many cases it specifically prohibited from engaging in. people open themselves up, and the state has a right to even look at it. >> i will take one that came through the remote viewers, ed snowden, hero or trader, i will quote associates in the nsa that came out, three senior nsa officers who among them working for the nsa, they have all been whistle-blowers for the past seven years trying to go through the official whistle-blower channel, they cannot get any traction on it. that is good enough for me. i want to thank everybody for being here. robert higgs and anthony gregory and especially all of view, this i
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 6:00pm EDT
't he showing some leadership?" who's he talking about? george bush? "i'll tell you something. when the [skips word] hits the fan and his gang comes to me for advice, i'm not going to provide it unless they are willing to thank me publicly. neither reagan nor bush" -- this must be... >> guest: referring to clinton. c-span: ... bill clinton. "neither reagan nor bush did that after all these years of my advice and, frankly, i've had it. they'll find me when they need me, but i may not be available." did he really mean that? >> guest: i'm not sure he was referring to clinton there. he may have been referring to the bush campaign. i'm not sure. we'll have to clarify that. c-span: but there's a lot of that kind of a quote in the book... >> guest: right. c-span: ... about different politicians and the advice that they would seek from him, but they wouldn't acknowledge it publicly. what was that all about? >> guest: that's right. well, generally that was a problem with the republican presidents, because obviously there was a great political problem for them in dealing with richard nixon. t
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 10:00pm EDT
have claimed and therefore george bush could say don't pay into it, simply give each person the fund and they can invest on their pension. if you monetize your deferred compensation, that is a terrible idea. it further damages the devotee of people to have social and there is a link to having a social wage is that it dramatically is important for the society because then people start to see of objectively the interest is united. one of the great tracks to american history is rather than to countercyclical spending through the social expenditure, it is always been done through the military spending. you spend militarily through bringing the economy back to life. that was the whole post world war golden age etc we've so in that sense one has to confront this idea because it is easy to do the spending on the military because it is already a hari article society in the military and encampment that the more you begin to feel objectively or ties with other people are there you might be able to create a political movement where people subjectively then relate to the common agenda and i thin
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 11:00pm EDT
baker had with george bush because -- i don't know exactly the reason, but i said, for example, the other day, the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with the russian president has started arranging a relationship. if i was secretary of state would not have tolerated that. that is my job. and as national security adviser , you're a staff person, not a principle. i remember when general powell got the role. he understood. he came around to me and said, i am a member of your staff. obviously the president is my main guy, but my job is to staff the council. and so i think that is beginning to get out of kilter. in my book have quite a lot to say about the structural governance and how it is going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary george shultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: i'm not worried. an observant. i see that the demographics of the world had changed and are continuing to change rapidly. the developed countries basically have no fertility. they are getting to be older
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 12:00pm EDT
served as the chief economist of the council of economic advisers under president george bush. manuel pastor is the professor of sociology in american studies and ethnicity at the university of southern california. he's also the director of their program on environmental and region aleck bity -- regional equity, and for our purposes today most importantly, codirector of the center for the study of immigrant integration. and he's published a couple of reports recently that he'll bring to light today about the importance of citizenship. jose antonio vargas is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist, film maker and the founder of define american, a campaign that seeks to elevate the immigration conversation. he is another profile in courage. in 2011 in "the new york times" magazine, he publicly revealed himself as undocumented and shared his life story of being raised by his grandparents in the u.s. from the age of 12 when he left his birthplace in the philippines. he has since become a national immigrants' rights advocate and leader for comprehensive immigration reform activist including th
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 12:00pm EDT
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impeachment. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that where he has gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very -- i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. but, you know, what? that's the price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 12:30am EDT
, and compare it with what current history contrast to the way george debut bush took them but different conflicts of different styles but if they took him to work quite quickly she could nurture more into in some ways he would beat them around the headed cannot persuade many other countries that it was worth fighting so roosevelt is the opposite this book tells the story of this incredible effort although subtle over the course of two years to build the of bipartisan domestic consensus in adults and early intervention and prepared to use other countries to feed from behind -- leave them behind and was prepared to take his time. in fact, the result was criticized almost as much to felt he was going too fast period he did it it. >> is a very clear direction but he wanted to do is no way that that the country did not into the ward / e merge united and ready for the fight. >> again and 11 came at the beginning. >> and pearl harbor helped. it totally destroyed isolationism in the united states at that time. but by then roosevelt had marginalized the bodies through the danish with the decisio
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 10:00pm EDT
of the george w. bush presidency. it was good to see so many former colleagues in the room to host the event tonight. with that i would like to introduce the former chief of staff mrs. laura bischoff. [applause] >> good morning everyone. thanks for coming. this has been an incredible turn out. in fact, as you know, he was on fox news has one of his interviews. i went on facebook and i said when are you going to do your party in washington? and he responded like that. would you be willing to host it? [laughter] >> immediately. >> thank you so much for hosting us here at edelman and brian mccormick and all the coasts that are here. i don't want to start with names because i will forget all of 30 of you that were willing to support this and also your book. so we thank you so much for doing that. we know that we had an incredible turn out. we could sit about 200 people and we have responses as you know for the waiting list. so, we know we've run out of books. i was just told, however, we were told there was possible. you can still order the book and these are bookplates. they are nice and big an
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 4:30pm EDT
back and bite you. by the early -- after the president and george w. bush relationship, after 9/11, the immigration policy was not going anywhere. i decided best thing for me was to get back to mention -- mexico. there was industry changes. the economic crisis affected us, and i was basically had no other choice other than cover drug trafficking because it was the big story. it's, i think, like many mexicans, i had tried to look away or not really -- not really look at the monster, you know, face-to-face. after that incident, after that, i covered various stories and saw how deep the penetration was. from that point on, i mean, i didn't look back. it is a personal story. it's a personal memoir and gorpny, but i hope that enriches the reader in many ways. >> ambassador, how do you feel about how mexico has dealt with or looked at itself in the mirror? >> yeah, actually, we had this conversation as you mentioned many times, and i've said i don't have the same necessarily love aware with mexico, and one of the things he said that had we been sitting in the restaurant, you said, as
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 4:30pm EDT
and compare it for us in modern history, current history for example contrasted with the way george w. bush took this nation to the war. >> if president bush took america to war quite quickly and didn't nurture a bipartisan consensus in some ways he used it around for the hid. ki wasn't able to persuade other countries, many other countries with the exception of britain and a few others that it was worth fighting and so america more or less went in to hit by himself. the book tells the story of an incredible effort over the course of two years to build a domestic consensus in favor of internationalism and ultimately intervention and he was prepared to use other countries as proxy's by allowing the brits and the french. he was prepared to take this kind and roosevelt was criticized almost as much he felt he was going too fast. he felt he was going too slowly. he did it carefully and slowly. that is the reaction to the events and get. when you step back and look at the whole run there is a direction as kurt says he knew where he wanted to end up but he wanted to do it in a way that took the c
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 8:00pm EDT
them because they won their freedom. of the president. we george bush blocked loans from the inter-american development of foundation of 146 million. loans for water, education, things like that. the international republican institute arranged and organized the opposition to it. we as a country trained soldier in the dominican republic. trained and armed those rebels didn't figure in to it. the bush -- when the american soldiers arrived at the home of the president and took him off at 3:00 in the morning to the central african republican. we had to go there. maxine waters, a jamaican parliament tear, sharon hay webster, the president's lawyer flew off with a plane to rescue him and bring him back to jamaica and condoleezza rice threatened the jamie can government to make it very difficult for them. if jamaican accepted it. all because he said the minimum income ought to be raised from $1 a day to $2 a day. that the sweat shop owners essentially white in haiti combined with american authorities to get him thrown out of office. if you look at the history of american foreign aid. what
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 12:00pm EDT
, therefore, george bush could say, well, don't pay into it. simply give each potential -- each person a fund. you monetize your deferred compensation. it's a terrible idea. it further damages the ability of people to have a social thing. and by the way, the link to having a social wage is that it's dramatic create important for society. -- dramatically important for society. because then people start to see objectively their interests are united. you know, one of the great tricks of american history is rather than do countercyclical spending through social expenditure, countercyclical spending in america has always been done through military spending. you spend militarily to bring the economy back to life. that was the whole post-war golden age, etc. so in that sense one has to confront this idea, you know, because it was easy to do countercyclical spending with the military because it's already a hierarchical society, you know, in military encampments. but society is not hierarchical, and the more you begin to feel objectively that your ties with other people are there, you might be able to
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 8:30pm EDT
and much more popular than george bush but that glory is fleeting because they are in an untenable situation where their success is an immediate unfavorable referendum that everybody before them, do they have certain personality qualities and ambitions and visions that make them suspect by their peers. sort of like this 19th century western figure that we see in 20th century films where it's high noon, ethan edwards, the magnificent seven, the man is shot liberty balance. we bring these people in and they are suspect figures and we all want shane to do something to get rid of the -- but it's better he walks out the door. it's better that high noon will kaine takes the bag and throws it down and says i've had enough. whether we like it or not it didn't end very well. themistocles committed suicide in persia. belisarius ended up as a beggar on the streets of constantinople humiliated at his emperor. sherman was called crazy and called a terrorist. he spent most of his post-war career trying to defend what it in a very effective way but he wasn't popular like grant or matthew ridgway.
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 6:00am EDT
known about this program. it was revealed in "the new york times" in 2005. george bush then finally partially declass fried it, and i learned for the first time to my extreme dismay that in the first three and a half years of this program which was developed by the bush administration, the president had used his article ii authorities. he's the commander in chief, to run the program rather than the provisions of law, fisa, which congress enacted in 1978 -- a fact you ought to all know. the foreign intelligence surveillance act was passed in 1978 in response to the abuses of the nixon administration and a recommendation of the church commission, and it set up a careful system of a fisa court composed of federal judges and intelligence committees on the hill which were set up then to monitor these fisa applications. and it worked very well, in my view, through 2011 -- 2001, and then the bush administration yanked it and ran it a different way. congress after that pulled it back under fisa, and i think, i believe strongly that maybe the amount of metadata is excessive. i'm sure my budd
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2013 6:00am EDT
to serve under president george w. bush until 2002. before being given a straight to fha shows both -- shows both actintheacting deputy administrf the federal highway administration. she was the logan airport in boston manager and she currently heads the u.s. public-private partnership at jpmorgan. most importantly she is past chairman of the bipartisan policy center board of directors here and continues to be a board member with us. so in 1997, ms. garvey, when you first took over as they a, the agency was spending about $9 billion. and shortly before you arrived, the agency itself estimated you would need 10 billion annually to make growing, passenger usage and also for of course protecting the safety of the flying public. and yet as i recall, the budget resolution that your were only going to provide you about 7a half billion, or two and a half billion dollar gap. further complicating your job as you were coming in, and assessment of the agency was mandated by 1996 agency reauthorization act, and it concluded there and i quote, faa had no system to account for its costs, and the
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 11:00pm EDT
a job in america to read >> republican with caller. >> caller: why did george bush wants to sell parts and then sell to you guys before and? >> host: i don't know if you remember in 2004 the company wanted to buy a port in the united states to be a >> guest: i certainly remember that. >> guest: we've remember to privatizing and had several bids at the time and decided to keep it state-owned. >> guest: that is also true. the caller is referring to when there was a discussion locally about actually selling the port to the company that was foreign controlled and that came to a halt and i thought that was the right thing at the time. >> what does it mean that this is a state-owned entity versus having a private company? >> guest: it is run in the public good and you have to maximize short-term profits. we can look at the long term benefits over the agenda and that is one thing i am delighted we have not. we have to consider all but now it is in control of the quarterly dividend. >> i don't know if you know the answer to this is the court sustained by the revenues? >> 100% sustained by the
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 8:00am EDT
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 12:00pm EDT
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impatient. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that when he is gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very safe. i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you are not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spin you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son had major surgery. for our procedure. but, you know, what? that's a price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i paid f
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 2:00pm EDT
that both in terms of his experience here at the george george bush institute but more partly in terms of his experience as an army officer. >> thank you robert payday would like to start out by wishing congratulations to our newest citizens. my experience over the past 24 years as active military service has been in our our most engage service-oriented and patriotic citizens and servicemembers are our newest. and so as the director of the military service initiatives here i had the honor and responsibility to lead the bush institute's effort to honor the service and sacrifice of all of their post-9/11 veterans military servicemembers and their families but also to empower and unite the efforts of non-profits businesses universities individual citizens and communities to improve the well-being of those veteran servicemembers and their families but also to release their potential to continue to serve as national assets in their communities after their military service is over. and so since september 11, 2001, 2.3 million members of this country have gone -- worn the uniform in iraq or a
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 5:00pm EDT
the reasoning behind why george bush wanted to sell the ports and did he contact beforehand? >> host: i think he is referring to, 2004 at the dubai company wanted to buy a port in the united states. >> guest: i certainly remember that. >> guest: we consider privatizing the ports here in norfolk. we had several bids but i think in the fullness of time i decided to keep it stayed on. >> host: what does that mean? >> guest: there was a reason i sent and the caller, that's also true. the color i believe is referring to when there was a discussion here locally about actually selling the port to a company that was foreign controlled and that came to a full hault. >> host: what does it mean to you guys that this is sustained sustained-state-owned entity versus a private company? >> guest: frankly is run in the public good and if it's privately-owned you have to maximize short-term profits. if its government-owned we can look at the long-term benefit to the commonwealth of virginia and i think that is the one thing i am delighted that we did not sell. just being responsible we had to consider all of the
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 9:00am EDT
george bush when he talked about this program when it was first revealed by "the new york times." he said, well, when al qaeda and call somebody in the united states, i want to know who they're calling. that's kind of the underlying philosophy of this program, and i think it's the purpose. we're talking, it tends to spill over into people thinking, well, maybe we are monitoring their actual content of the conversation and we're not. it's medicaid, records, effectively the outside of the envelope that is put in your mailbox. it's that information that is on the envelope. and the date stamp and the postmark. >> would you have people believe that metadata have no significant privacies? i would rather if i had a choice, i hope not have either of these choices, of having every phone conversation i have for 30 days listening to them which, of course, is impractical to have a large number of people doing that, or all my metadata collected for 30 days? i would much rather -- >> collected by proctor and gamble oracle victoria beckham corporation, then i would be worried. and i think sometimes we d
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2013 9:00am EDT
by president clinton in 197 and vry bipartisan, as she continued to serve under president george w. bush until 2002. before being the administer of faa shows both the acting deputy administrator of the federal highway administration. she was the logan airport in boston manager, and she currently heads the u.s. public-private partnership at jpmorgan. most importantly, she is past chairman of the bipartisan policy center board of directors here, and continues to be a board member with us. so in 1997, ms. garvey, when you first took over at the a, the agency was being about $9 billion. and charlie before you arrived, the agency itself had estimated that you would need 10 billion annually to meet growing passenger usage and also for of course protecting the safety of the flying public. and yet as i recall, the budget resolution that year were only going to project only going to budget of 7a half billion, or two and a half billion dollars gap. further complicating your job as you were coming in, and assessment of the agency was mandated by 1996 agency reauthorization act, and it concluded, and i qu
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 11:00pm EDT
to talk about the cause of this and we took a little bit of heat from the george w. bush campaign is for not being prepared to wage traditional conflict due to the task force is. this would be the most likely vehicle also in the professional military education sphere. the peacekeeping stabilization operation institute and the u.s. army war college in the national defense immigration will continue to be part of this is expertise onto which we can draw. but i do expect good compared to matters. one case study talks about how it took more care can work anywhere. >> we have about six people so far and maybe a few others to try to fit you all in. >> hello, my name is piers martin and i'm here at the georgetown university. my question is related to one of the main ideas which is to broaden our positions and a conflict that was one of the first reactions from the united states is reaction and the european union started. working and building of institutions for common security and defense policy. as there seems to be quite a change of discussion right now because the discussions we are ha
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2013 7:00am EDT
mac. from the george w. bush presidential center in dallas, this is 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, mr. secretary, for the kind introduction. i don't know if you can see me, this is a rather large podium. [laughter] it reminds me of what i frequently tell my washington colleagues, everything's bigger in texas but me. [laughter] if you can't see me, at least you can hear me. anyway, i was delighted to accept the invitation to speak before the bipartisan policy center for a couple of reasons. number one, because of the outstanding work that you have done in the housing arena and, number two, i live about three miles from here, so it took me about seven minutes to get here. anyway, the truth is as a fairly new chairman of standing committee of congress, if the truth be known, i have a number of speaking invitations that come my way. a lot of press that's interested in speaking to me, but i assure you, i do not have to work to remain humble. but because i have a lot of speaking invitations, i accept a lot of them. and at this home about three miles are here, about two months ago i
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2013 12:00pm EDT
there were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. it goes back to the thing we kind of started out with. the federal government is out of control. but it has been predicted by all of the historians that the republic would fail. the question is, how do we teach history, go back, every embrace the thing that made america great? and as i said earlier, i think we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference. i worked every day trying to do things. i am convinced the only way we do that is half the state start exerting their temporary authority and reassessing -- [applause] -- changes to the constitution that restore federalism in the constitution. and so i think that is the way. you are frustrated. you want to see me in washington. asked my staff. as my wife. i want to pull my hair out. you know, i see two things. i see the constitution, and see what is happening to it. then i see grown men and women who know what the constitution says you don't care. that is what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2013 2:00pm EDT
on the consulate. if this had been george bush and you had a republican, there would not have -- candy crowley, the way she answered herself to jump to the president's defense in that third debate or second debate was so inappropriate. it went beyond the pale. and i really don't believe that if that was a republican incumbent she would have jumped in like that. going back to the 2008 campaign the president's relationship with the rev. jeremiah right, is rare print for 20 years, obama belonged to is church. he had incendiaries sermons that he gave. he baptizes children, married -- de presided over the marriage between president obama and michele. and that really got scant attention by the mainstream media. these were all full sermons that he gave saying that basically americans deserve what they have i won't repeat a lot of the awful things that the reference said. but also really the president's failed record in his first term. the media did not hold the president accountable. when the president said, if i can't get the job done in four years i should be a one-term president. if he said that,
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 1:30pm EDT
for george w. bush in the first administration. so he says that that this can result in ships to africa and then he says, of course, that the market conditions are where the trade is made. so let me show you this video. we have 750,000 people and these companies are pouring their investment dollars into china. this is an executive is taking us on a two or and listen to what he has to say about why the ipod is made where it is. let's play the audio. >> we are going to try to run this video again. >> we are talking about the free market. is that the free-market? now. if you do business with the mafia, we have laws against that for good reason. frankly i advocate laws that shift our economic relationship. we get taken advantage of in my free-market friends say that american consumers benefit and it's true. so how long does this last? will i have to pay to protect the environment from this? then it gets shipped off to china. so what do the chinese get? get a factory in productive capacity. billions of dollars in american capital. i don't think so. we are trying to get over are our very naÏ
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 6:00am EDT
't the same kind of relationships that i had with president nixon that, say, jim baker had with george bush. because i don't know exactly the reason. but i saw, for example, the other day that the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with putin and started ranging that relationship. if i was secretary of state, i would not tolerate that. that's my job. and the national security adviser's a staff person, not a principal. i remember when colin powell got the job of secretary of national security adviser, he understood. and he came around to me, and he said i'm a member of your staff. obviously, the president's my main guide, but with my job is to staff the could be is ill. the council. and so i think that's beginning to get out of kilter, and in my book i have quite a lot to say about the structure of governance and how it's going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary schultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: oh, i'm not worried about it, i'm observant of it. i see that the demographics of the
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